A Guide To Integrating New Employees To Your Workplace



Onboarding new employees in the workplace are important in the employee lifecycle. Yes, some of them can be stressed, anxious, eager to please, or even vulnerable as they join your team. It is, therefore, essential to provide a nurturing environment that will introduce your new employees to the culture of your company. To help you tap into these benefits and the importance of onboarding, we have provided a step-by-step guide on how you can integrate new employees into your workplace.

What is onboarding?

This is the process of accommodating new employees into the workplace. While on it, there’s a need to engage both the current employees and new employees in multiple activities. To new employees, your responsibility as the head is to provide information about the company, such as missions, visions, values, working culture, goals, working tools, and responsibilities. To the current employees, you ought to notify them about new arrivals. Your work doesn’t end at that point, though. You should also follow up after a while to see how the employees are coping with the changes. Let’s dive deeper into these sections.

  1. Announce to the rest of the team 

After hiring, it is quite apparent that some changes will manifest in the workplace. This is the main reason why you should notify other team members about new employees. Some employees lose some tasks while others may gain new responsibilities such as giving orientation about the workplace. Providing prior information gives current employees time to prepare for the changes and accept the new person quickly. It also sets an impressive image of you and the company. It shows that you care about employee engagement and creating productive relationships. 

2.Create engagement before the first day 

Start the engagement process as soon as an employee accepts the job. There are no restrictions on what or how you can share the information as long as it benefits the employee. Lucky for you, there are options. You may opt for HR tools that accommodate the onboarding processes of educating or inviting the new employee to the workplace. For better results, create space for feedback to show transparency about the organization and also give confidence that the decision was worthy. 



3. Make an impression on the first day 

First impressions matter, this has been said countless times. So, without looking at the position that the new employees are to take, set them up for success with a good impression. Remember that new employees also need firsthand information about the culture and the norms in the organization. If none is provided, they may remain quiet or shy from engaging in conversations. Also, when introducing the new employee to the team, create a positive attitude to promote acceptance. Avoid making statements that can make others feel insecure. 

The bottom line; create an interactive and welcoming environment. 

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4. Assign a guide

If you are operating in a large organization, you may not be able to capture everything in a day. Also, since there is so much that can only be experienced, a guide will help the new employee to adapt quickly. Guides keep a close watch over new employees to ensure they are fully acquainted with the workplace, are following the rules, and are not discriminated against or harassed. They also answer questions about the workplace on behalf of the management. Workplace mentors also come in handy if the employee is taking an advanced role or has changed the working environment. For instance, if the new employee is moving from a manual workplace to a machine-operated, assigning a mentor allows them to familiarize with the roles quickly, catch up, and bring value to the company. 

5. Seek feedback from employees

While assigning a guide to new employees is helpful, it is half the task. The guide may get caught up in his or her career or fail to answer the questions comprehensively. For easy integration, take the initiative of seeking feedback about the workplace after a short duration. Your approach will come in handy, especially if new employees fear being misunderstood by their guides or are withholding back if they feel that the guide may not offer valuable solutions. Seeking feedback also solidifies the initial statement that workplace values transparency and employee engagement. 

Final words:

You can ensure the smoothest possible transition of your employees by following the steps we have outlined. The integration of new employees into a new workplace is not a day’s task. In reality, it involves thorough planning and follows up to verify the impact of the actions taken.  Remember, your new employees are your new assets. So give them the best experience as they join your team!